DC Schools Paying Kids $5.25 An Hour to Attend Summer School

As a final testament to the failure that is the Educational Industrial Complex in Washington, DC, the schools are now paying students to attend summer school:

The District is paying 305 students with poor academic and behavioral records to attend summer school, The Washington Examiner has learned.

The rising ninth-graders are earning $5.25 an hour to participate in the “Summer Bridge” program, which targets students identified by D.C. Public Schools as less likely than their peers to graduate high school within four years.

The 95 students who voluntarily signed up for the summer school program will receive half of an elective credit. But to fill the 400-student session with at-risk students, DCPS reached out to the Department of Employment Services. More than 300 students flagged by DCPS and who had signed up for the Summer Youth Employment Program were told that school would be their jobs this summer.

I remember when I was a kid, I received around $5 an hour for my job, but it wasn’t sitting in a classroom doing what I should have done during the previous school year.  How is this not rewarding failure?

Do a great job during the school year and you get the summer to go work at a real job.  Do nothing all year and you get to sit in an air conditioned class and make $5.25 an hour for doing what you should have already done.

At least this will be a learning experience, right?  We’ll learn whether students can be paid to learn:

This summer isn’t the first time the city has paid students to learn.The District allowed a Harvard University group to pay about 3,000 middle-school students up to $100 a month for good grades during the 2008-09 and 2009-10 school years. Grades overall didn’t improve significantly.

That sounds about right.

So, we pay for the property and all the maintenance involved with it, we pay for the custodians, we pay for the teachers and we pay for all the learning material and now, we’ll pay for the students to sit and do nothing special.

Welcome to Washington, DC.

 

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